For Jack, it is 9pm when he hears my strained voice for the 1st time more than the facebook messenger contact. I am just waking up. 

I am confident he’s use to hearing sleepy voices with his loved ones back right here in Waikato, but that is what you sign up for when you travel the planet as a shearer. 

When Jack Fagan left higher college he had two points on his thoughts. Travel the planet and buy a farm. 

It really is just about 10 years on and the farm boy, raised in the depths of King Country’s Te Kūiti, has grown up and made his dreams a reality via an unexpected ability.

Like pro surfers and snowboarders, Fagan, 27, has chased the seasons about the planet, but rather of looking for gnarliest waves or the softest pow he’s seeking for the wooliest sheep.

Jack Fagan (left) stands with friend and rival speed shearer Frenchman Thimoleon Resneau (right) after winning the  World Shearing and Woolhandling Championships Open Speed Shear in Limoges, France.

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Jack Fagan (left) stands with pal and rival speed shearer Frenchman Thimoleon Resneau (proper) immediately after winning the Planet Shearing and Woolhandling Championships Open Speed Shear in Limoges, France.

“There is a big opportunity to go out and earn some excellent funds [shearing] and travel the planet when you happen to be young … and you can do it all year around as well.

“I travel solo about the planet mainly. I’ve got mates all more than the planet so that is the wonderful this about shearing is when you travel you can meet new mates, you operate for the season and then you leave, but then subsequent spot you go to you have got yet another group of mates to catch up with, so it sort of ends up becoming a in no way ending circuit.”

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So far he’s worked seasons in Australia, England, Wales, Norway, France, Corsica and Sardinia, as nicely as competing in shearing champs in Ireland, Northern Ireland and Germany.

When he spoke to Stuff, he was in the Cumbrian mountains in England.

Fagan started out as a sheepo – moving the animals from the back of the woolshed into holding pens – in Norway when he was 17 before settling into the blades, which he’s not half terrible at.

Speed shearer Jack Fagan, 27, in action.

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Speed shearer Jack Fagan, 27, in action.

In fact, he’s so excellent that he took out the Planet Shearing and Woolhandling Championships Open Speed Shear earlier this month in Limoges city centre, France.

But as one particular of Sir David Fagan’s sons – New Zealand’s most productive competitors sheep shearer – the game runs in his blood.

His prize was a locally produced porcelain plate, which he admired when delivering his acceptance speech in the national tongue.

The feeling you get from the speed shears is indescribable, Fagan stated.

“I appreciate the adrenaline, like immediately after a significant win frequently I cannot sleep simply because you happen to be that hyped up.

“That is what I appreciate performing, it is the atmosphere, the crowd, the public. It really is just insane some of the atmospheres all about the planet.

“Persons are cheering and there is generally music playing and often if you make the final you get to choose your personal song … [for me] it is generally AC/DC.”

Jack Fagan wins the pictured porcelain plate crafted by a local artist at the World Shearing and Woolhandling Championships Open Speed Shear in Limoges, France.

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Jack Fagan wins the pictured porcelain plate crafted by a neighborhood artist at the Planet Shearing and Woolhandling Championships Open Speed Shear in Limoges, France.

Excitedly, he recalled a cherished memory from final year’s planet championship speed shear in Wales.

“It was the most insane atmosphere you can ever imagine like often you turn up and it is like being in a club but you happen to be shearing sheep, or a rock concert.”

Fagan averages about 30 competitions a year plus 20 speed shears, with his most current win becoming his 26th open speed shearing title.

“There is a lot of shearers who will keep residence in New Zealand and operate the season in the north and south island, but I prefer to chase the summers and shear a bit in the southern hemisphere and do the competitions as nicely. 

“The guys that go overseas are the ones who want to travel and practical experience a new culture. It really is not all about the funds, when you get overseas you have got a sense of freedom.”

3 years ago he went in on a dairy farm with his parents, but he hopes to return to sheep and beef farming as soon as the investment pays off. 

But the new farm will not place an finish to his adventures, Fagan stated. 

“We have share milkers on the dairy farm, so I continue to travel and operate.”